Likely no motorcycle has inspired so many workshops (and for so long) to built specials. The Vincent v-twin is on that perspective one of a kind. Indeed when the factory stopped manufacturing motorcycles in 1955, the performances of the Vincent engine were still far ahead compare to any other engines, so very quickly modifications on the Vincent chassis started to appear: brakes upgrades, telescopic front forks, and conventional rear suspensions before the hybridization with competitive rolling frames. Among these, the Norton Featherbed remains the most famous until Fritz Egli presented his new concept in 1967. On this page you will find some of the most famous conversions. You can refer as well to the dedicated pages foreach of them.

Philippe Guyony © 2013-2016

NORVIN One of the finest example of a Norvin that you can find. It combines the stock Norton Manx frame (wide loop above the gearbox, and very importantly the crankcases have not been cheeped to fit a Burman gearbox.
The NorVin (see specific page)
One of the finest example of a Norvin that you can find. It combines the stock Norton Manx frame (wide loop above the gearbox).
PARKIN-VINCENT Built between the early 60s and early 70s by Derek Parkin, a racer from West London. About 10 exist: it uses a Vincent headstock, and some Velocette frame parts, with Norton forks, this model seen in the USA was made in 1962 | info David Lancaster. When Keesecker got the Parkin 10 years ago, it was ready for help. “Cosmetically, it was horrible, and the tank was crushed on one side,” he says. “Fortunately, the engine was in good shape. Really, everything inside looked almost brand new.” Restoration centered on repairing and color-matching the tank (a bit of original paint was still visible on the tank’s underside), reconstructing the seat pan and giving the engine (a Series C Black Shadow) a general freshening.. Extract from www.motorcycleclassics.com
The Parkin-Vincent (see specific page)
Built between the early 60s and early 70s by Derek Parkin, a racer from West London. About 10 exist: it uses a Vincent headstock, and a modified Vincent rear frame with Norton forks. This model seen in the USA was made in 1962 | info David Lancaster.
CURTIS-VINCENT This bikes belongs now to Jay Leno; This is the original owner, Jim Brokensha, in Vancouver Canada (1975). You will note that the Vincent bloc has been heavily transformed and a Norton Commando primary case replace the Vincent one. (see previous picture for the other side and the link to Curtis website)
The Curtis-Vincent (see specific page)
This bikes belongs now to Jay Leno; The original owner, Jim Brokensha, lived in Vancouver Canada (1975). You will note that the Vincent bloc has been heavily transformed and a Norton Commando primary case replace the Vincent one.
CAPON-VINCENT No information on this bike
The Capon-Vincent (see specific page)
NERO A very rare bike that could be mistaken for an Egli but it is not! This bike was rebuilt in 1957 for a Frenchman named Marc Bellon after a road crash and he own the bike until 2009 before selling it in the UK. George Brown himself built the RFM (rear frame) and installed a conventional front fork, so the bike kept its VIN# and registration. The bike name is NERO as Brown's Vincent racers. Brown built 3 similar bikes.
The street Nero (see specific page)
A very rare bike that could be mistaken for an Egli but it is not! This bike was built in 1957 for a Frenchman named Marc Bellon after a road crash and he own the bike until 2009 before selling it in the UK.
CEES FICK This bike presented in a French magazine has a different frame.
The Cees Fick (see specific page)
THE VINCATI There is lot of example of motorcycle hybridization and the idea is pretty simple: you “just” drop a different engine in a rolling frame. Easy? just have to look at the numerous Norvin assembled in the 50s: many of them were clearly approximate or unfinished. Now, to get a result like this, it requires clearly some Engineering skills. So was born the Vincati.
The Vincati (see specific page)
The blend of the Vincent v-twin engine with a Ducati “bevel” frame.

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